Quick Answer: Who Is Apostrophe?

Who’s son or whose son?

The correct choice is whose.

So what is the difference between whose and who’s.

The word whose is the possessive form of the pronoun who.

It is used in questions to ask who owns something, has something, etc..

Is it Chris’s or Chris ‘?

Which is correct, Chris’s chair or Chris’ chair? James’s car or James’ car? Actually, both ways are correct. If a proper name ends with an s, you can add just the apostrophe or an apostrophe and an s.

What is a possessive apostrophe?

How to use a possessive apostrophe. An apostrophe can be used to show that one thing belongs to or is connected to something. This is called a possessive apostrophe.

What are the 3 Uses of apostrophe?

The apostrophe has three uses: 1) to form possessive nouns; 2) to show the omission of letters; and 3) to indicate plurals of letters, numbers, and symbols.

What is the sign of apostrophe?

The apostrophe (‘ or ‘) character is a punctuation mark, and sometimes a diacritical mark, in languages that use the Latin alphabet and some other alphabets. In English, it is used for three purposes: The marking of the omission of one or more letters (as in the contraction of do not to don’t).

What are the 2 types of apostrophes?

The two types of apostrophes are apostrophes of possession and contraction. Possessive apostrophes indicate ownership of something, like in the…

How do you shorten an apostrophe in words?

By replacing a letter, an apostrophe can join two words, forming a contraction such as “doesn’t,” the abbreviated form of “does not.” It can also replace letters to help shorten a single word, such as in the case of “rock ‘n’ roll,” where apostrophes take the place of both the “a” and the “d” in “and,” and in the case …

Whose fault or who’s fault?

First off, you need the possessive pronoun of who in front of the noun fault; that’s whose, not who’s. Who’s is the contraction of who is or who has. Second, the sentence is not in the interrogative.

Is it Mr Jones or Mr Jones’s?

Jones = Mr. Jones’s. Some people favor adding only an apostrophe to a singular noun ending in s, but if you follow the rule, you can’t be wrong. If a plural noun does not end in an s, you must make it possessive by adding an apostrophe and an s: women’s; children’s.

What is apostrophe give example?

When using a singular noun, the apostrophe is used before the s. For example: “The squirrel’s nuts were stashed in a hollow tree.” When using a plural noun, the apostrophe goes after the s. For example: “The squirrels’ nuts were hidden in several hollow trees throughout the forest.”

How do you use an apostrophe correctly?

Apostrophe Rules for PossessivesUse an apostrophe + S (‘s) to show that one person/thing owns or is a member of something. … Use an apostrophe after the “s” at the end of a plural noun to show possession. … If a plural noun doesn’t end in “s,” add an apostrophe + “s” to create the possessive form.

Does things need an apostrophe?

If you can say “it is” in its place, then you DO need the apostrophe. If its is showing something has possession or ownership of something, then you do NOT need an apostrophe and using its is correct. The dog was chewing on its bone. (Possessive because the bone is in the possession of the dog.)

Whose or who’s example?

Who’s is a contraction, meaning it’s two words stuck together. The formula: who + is, or who + has. For example: who’s hungry? Whose is a possessive pronoun.

Who would with an apostrophe?

The apostrophe in contractionsTypeWithout contractionsContractionsUsing “would”I would, you would, he would, we would, they wouldI’d, you’d, he’d, we’d, they’dUsing “have”I have, you have, we have, they haveI’ve, you’ve, we’ve, they’veUsing “are”you are, they are, we areyou’re, they’re, we’re4 more rows

What are the 5 examples of apostrophe?

Apostrophe ExamplesTwinkle, twinkle, little star, how I wonder what you are. ( … O holy night! … Then come, sweet death, and rid me of this grief. ( … O, pardon me, thou bleeding piece of earth. ( … Roll on, thou deep and dark blue Ocean – roll! ( … Welcome, O life!More items…•